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The Critical Juncture in Aotearoa New Zealand and The Collective Future: Issues in Settler/Invader Colonial Zombiism Found in “Biculturalism.”

Simon, Hemopereki (2022) The Critical Juncture in Aotearoa New Zealand and The Collective Future: Issues in Settler/Invader Colonial Zombiism Found in “Biculturalism.”. International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies, 15 (1). pp. 119-142. ISSN 1837-0144. (Submitted) (doi:10.5204/ijcis.2329) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:96052)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL:
https://doi.org/10.5204/ijcis.2329

Abstract

This research examines the settler colonial legacy of Aotearoa New Zealand. It shows that

biculturalism has emerged as a discursive byproduct of neoliberalism and settler colonialism.

Simon’s recent work and the Te Paparahi o Te Raki Waitangi Tribunal decision aligns with the view

of a significant paradigm shift since biculturalism suppresses affirmation of and mana motuhake.

Biculturalism can be viewed through Moreton-Robinson’s white possessive lens as well as Beck's

zombie concepts, which are used to prop up deteriorating and/or fictional social institutions. As a

zombie concept in Aotearoa New Zealand, “biculturalism” supports settler/invader power structures.

Indigenous communities disproportionately experience the destructive consequences of neoliberal

policies and statecraft. Aotearoa New Zealand’s collective future requires abandoning biculturalism;

to that end the author recommends revising common historiographic thought concerning Te Tiriti o

Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) and the concept of “settling”.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.5204/ijcis.2329
Uncontrolled keywords: Settler Colonialism, Treaty of Waitangi, Biculturalism, Zombie Studies, White Possessive, Indigenous Policy
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
J Political Science > JC Political theory
J Political Science > JQ Political institutions and public administrations (Asia, Africa, Australia, Pacific Area, etc.)
J Political Science > JV Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Arts and Humanities > School of English
Funders: [135] University of Kent
Depositing User: Hemopereki Simon
Date Deposited: 04 Aug 2022 14:49 UTC
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2022 17:28 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/96052 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Simon, Hemopereki: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3764-0995
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