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Monumentality, Skyscrapers, and Being human

Korolija Fontana-Giusti, Gordana (2022) Monumentality, Skyscrapers, and Being human. In: Loukaki, A. and Alifragkis, S., eds. On Monumentality. Cambridge Scholars, Cambridge, UK. (Submitted) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:95014)

Abstract

The public has reacted to the monumental skyscrapers of today in an ambiguous fashion; unlike during the twentieth century when citizens expressed anxiety about the large-scale buildings, this attitude has changed. It has turned into a fascination (conscious or unconscious) with the monumental new structures and urban landscapes they produce. The tall buildings became special objects to be viewed and places from where the views can potentially be taken. This chapter looks behind this phenomenon addressing the nature of the perception and the experience of monumental buildings through historical and theoretical narratives and visual representations. The emergence of recent tall edifices has been propelled by neo-liberal global capitalism and widespread consumers’ scopophilia. Has there been something archetypal in human nature that was attracted to this phenomenon? By examining the background of this subject, the tradition of ascent and the drama of viewing from above, the chapter sheds new light on the precarious nature of this kind of monumentality today.

Item Type: Book section
Uncontrolled keywords: Monumentality, memory, urban perception, urban memory, being human
Subjects: N Visual Arts
N Visual Arts > NA Architecture
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Arts and Humanities > Kent School of Architecture and Planning
Depositing User: Gordana Fontana-Giusti
Date Deposited: 13 May 2022 10:44 UTC
Last Modified: 13 May 2022 10:50 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/95014 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Korolija Fontana-Giusti, Gordana: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4725-3753
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