Skip to main content

Breeding and rearing the Critically Endangered Lake Oku Clawed Frog (Xenopus longipes Loumont and Kobel 1991)

Michaels, C.J., Tapley, B., Harding, L., Bryant, Z., Grant, S., Sunter, G., Gill, I., Nyingchia, O., Doherty-Bone, T. (2015) Breeding and rearing the Critically Endangered Lake Oku Clawed Frog (Xenopus longipes Loumont and Kobel 1991). Amphibian & Reptile Conservation, 9 . pp. 100-110. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:90588)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://amphibian-reptile-conservation.org/pdfs/Vol...

Abstract

The Lake Oku Clawed Frog Xenopus longipes is a Critically Endangered, dodecaploid anuran endemic to Lake Oku in Cameroon. An ex situ population of this species was established at Zoological Society of London (ZSL), London Zoo in 2008, as well as at several other institutions, with the intention of providing data on the biology and husbandry of this species. We report the first captive breeding of the species. Adult frogs maintained under environmental conditions designed to mimic field data produced clutches of 7–300 eggs; eggs measured 1.23 mm in diameter, and were laid singly after a period of 6.5 hours in axial amplexus. Spawning took place only during the day. Tadpoles hatched in 2–3 days and development was very long compared to congeners, lasting 193–240+ days until metamorphosis. Tadpoles grew very large (maximum 79 mm total length), particularly compared with the relatively small adult size (maximum 36 mm Snout to Vent Length [SVL]). Tadpoles proved to be highly sensitive to total dissolved solids (TDS) in the water and only thrived when low levels (20 mg/L) were used. Metamorphosis concluded with an SVL of 19–25 mm and F1 animals began first sexual activity at 5–6 months post metamorphosis. These data will inform future husbandry in captivity as well as illuminating facets of biology previously unknown and difficult to determine in the field.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Amphibian, ex situ, captive husbandry, water quality, Cameroon, West Africa, field data
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Benjamin Tapley
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2021 09:49 UTC
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2021 15:46 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/90588 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Michaels, C.J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4733-8397
Tapley, B.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9787-3793
Harding, L.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2752-4966
Doherty-Bone, T.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8074-5955
  • Depositors only (login required):