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Leech blood‐meal invertebrate‐derived DNA reveals differences in Bornean mammal diversity across habitats

Drinkwater, Rosie, Jucker, Tommaso, Potter, Joshua H.T, Swinfield, Tom, Coomes, David, Slade, Eleanor M., Gilbert, M. Thomas P., Lewis, Owen T., Bernard, Henry, Struebig, Matthew J., and others. (2020) Leech blood‐meal invertebrate‐derived DNA reveals differences in Bornean mammal diversity across habitats. Molecular Ecology, . ISSN 0962-1083. E-ISSN 1365-294X. (doi:10.1111/mec.15724) (KAR id:84057)

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Abstract

The application of metabarcoding to environmental and invertebrate‐derived DNA (eDNA and iDNA) is a new and increasingly applied method for monitoring biodiversity across a diverse range of habitats. This approach is particularly promising for sampling in the biodiverse humid tropics, where rapid land‐use change for agriculture means there is a growing need to understand the conservation value of the remaining mosaic and degraded landscapes. Here we use iDNA from blood‐feeding leeches (Haemadipsa picta) to assess differences in mammalian diversity across a gradient of forest degradation in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. We screened 557 individual leeches for mammal DNA by targeting fragments of the 16S rRNA gene and detected 14 mammalian genera. We recorded lower mammal diversity in the most heavily degraded forest compared to higher quality twice logged forest. Although the accumulation curves of diversity estimates were comparable across these habitat types, diversity was higher in twice logged forest, with more taxa of conservation concern. In addition, our analysis revealed differences between the community recorded in the heavily logged forest and that of the twice logged forest. By revealing differences in mammal diversity across a human‐modified tropical landscape, our study demonstrates the value of iDNA as a non‐invasive biomonitoring approach in conservation assessments.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/mec.15724
Uncontrolled keywords: biodiversity; Borneo; Haemadipsidae; land-use change; invertebrate-derived DNA; molecular biomonitoring
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH541 Ecology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Matthew Struebig
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2020 09:35 UTC
Last Modified: 08 Mar 2021 16:35 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/84057 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Struebig, Matthew J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2058-8502
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