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Influence of aerobic fitness on gastrointestinal barrier integrity and microbial translocation following a fixed-intensity military exertional heat stress test

Ogden, Henry B., Fallowfield, Joanne L., Child, Robert B., Davison, Glen, Fleming, Simon C., Delves, Simon K., Millyard, Alison, Westwood, Caroline S., Layden, Joseph D. (2020) Influence of aerobic fitness on gastrointestinal barrier integrity and microbial translocation following a fixed-intensity military exertional heat stress test. European Journal of Applied Physiology, . ISSN 1439-6319. (doi:10.1007/s00421-020-04455-w) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:82829)

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Language: English

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https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-020-04455-w

Abstract

Purpose: Exertional-heat stress adversely disrupts gastrointestinal (GI) barrier integrity, whereby subsequent microbial translocation (MT) can result in potentially serious health consequences. To date, the influence of aerobic fitness on GI barrier integrity and MT following exertional-heat stress is poorly characterised. Method: Ten untrained (UT; VO2max = 45 ± 3 ml·kg−1·min−1) and ten highly trained (HT; VO2max = 64 ± 4 ml·kg−1·min−1) males completed an ecologically valid (military) 80-min fixed-intensity exertional-heat stress test (EHST). Venous blood was drawn immediately pre- and post-EHST. GI barrier integrity was assessed using the serum dual-sugar absorption test (DSAT) and plasma Intestinal Fatty-Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP). MT was assessed using plasma Bacteroides/total 16S DNA. Results: UT experienced greater thermoregulatory, cardiovascular and perceptual strain (p < 0.05) than HT during the EHST. Serum DSAT responses were similar between the two groups (p = 0.59), although Δ I-FABP was greater (p = 0.04) in the UT (1.14 ± 1.36 ng·ml−1) versus HT (0.20 ± 0.29 ng·ml−1) group. Bacteroides/Total 16S DNA ratio was unchanged (Δ; -0.04 ± 0.18) following the EHST in the HT group, but increased (Δ; 0.19 ± 0.25) in the UT group (p = 0.05). Weekly aerobic training hours had a weak, negative correlation with Δ I-FABP and Bacteroides/total 16S DNA responses. Conclusion: When exercising at the same absolute workload, UT individuals are more susceptible to small intestinal epithelial injury and MT than HT individuals. These responses appear partially attributable to greater thermoregulatory, cardiovascular, and perceptual strain.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s00421-020-04455-w
Uncontrolled keywords: Exercise, I-FABP, Endotoxemia, Exertional Heat Stroke, Gut Health
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation. Leisure > Sports sciences
R Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Glen Davison
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2020 08:56 UTC
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2020 08:57 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/82829 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Davison, Glen: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-0074
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