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Exploring dimensions of culture in good services for adults with severe and profound intellectual and developmental disabilities

Beadle-Brown, J., Fox, D., Bradshaw, J., Bigby, Christine (2019) Exploring dimensions of culture in good services for adults with severe and profound intellectual and developmental disabilities. In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. 63 (7). p. 710. Wiley (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:77716)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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Abstract

Introduction: Previous research has conceptualised culture across five dimensions: ‘alignment of power-holder values’, ‘regard for residents’, ‘perceived purpose’, ‘working practices’ and ‘orientation to change and ideas. This research explored these dimensions of culture in services rated as providing good support. Methods: Participant observations were carried out over 12 months, in two services (in different organisations) that supported 12 people with

intellectual disabilities. In addition, interviews were carried out with 25 frontline staff or practice leaders and 3 senior managers. Results: Although services were rated as good initially, over time changes in quality were observed. Services differed in which areas of support were rated as good. These differences allowed exploration of the variations possible across each dimension of culture and the relationships between culture and practice. Whereas in previous research, services tended to show similar patterns across dimensions, this research revealed differences in performance across dimensions both

within and between services. For example, service A was more open to change and ideas and stronger on regard for residents whilst weaker on working practices. Service B was better on working practices but weaker on regard. Implications: This study has illustrated the complexity of the relationships between dimensions of culture. This has implications for the ways in which culture can be measured and addressed.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Uncontrolled keywords: culture, Supported accommodaiton, Quality of support, Severe and profound intellectual disabilities
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Tizard
Depositing User: Diane Fox
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2019 11:41 UTC
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2021 10:39 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/77716 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Beadle-Brown, J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2306-8801
Fox, D.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9144-3883
Bradshaw, J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0379-8877
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