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The Bumps and BaBies Longitudinal Study (BaBBLeS): a multi-site cohort study of first-time mothers to evaluate the effectiveness of the Baby Buddy app

Deave, Toity, Ginja, Sam, Goodenough, Trudy, Bailey, Elizabeth, Coad, Jane, Day, Crispin, Nightingale, Samantha, Kendall, Sally, Lingam, Raghu (2019) The Bumps and BaBies Longitudinal Study (BaBBLeS): a multi-site cohort study of first-time mothers to evaluate the effectiveness of the Baby Buddy app. mHealth, 5 . E-ISSN 2306-9740. (doi:10.21037/mhealth.2019.08.05) (KAR id:76146)

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Abstract

Background: Health mobile applications (apps) have become very popular, including apps specifically designed to support women during the ante- and postnatal periods. However, there is currently limited evidence for the effectiveness of such apps at improving pregnancy and parenting outcomes.

Aim: to assess the effectiveness of a pregnancy and perinatal app, Baby Buddy, in improving maternal self-efficacy at three months post-delivery.

Conclusion: This study is one of few, to date, that has investigated the effectiveness of a pregnancy and early parenthood app. No evidence for the effectiveness of the Baby Buddy app was found. New technologies can enhance traditional healthcare services and empower users to take more control over their healthcare but app effectiveness needs to be assessed. Further work is needed to consider, a) how we can best use this new technology to deliver better health outcomes for health service users and, b) methodological issues of evaluating digital health interventions.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.21037/mhealth.2019.08.05
Uncontrolled keywords: Evaluation, first-time parents, Baby Buddy, self-efficacy, maternal well-being
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Meg Dampier
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2019 13:27 UTC
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2020 10:16 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/76146 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Kendall, Sally: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2507-0350
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