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Happiness, income and poverty

Clark, Andrew E. (2017) Happiness, income and poverty. International Review of Economics, 64 (2). pp. 145-158. ISSN 1865-1704. (doi:10.1007/s12232-017-0274-7) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12232-017-0274-7

Abstract

There is considerable evidence from a variety of sources to suggest that well-being is a function of relative income. These findings have been used to explain the Easterlin Paradox, whereby a rise in income for all does not lead to a rise in average happiness in a country (even though the cross section relationship between income and happiness is positive). This relativity of utility has led to calls for policy to focus away from GDP. I here first discuss some of the evidence that well-being is indeed relative in income, but then consider two relatively little-analysed issues to suggest that there may continue to be a role for GDP per capita in happiness-based policy: the inequality of subjective well-being, and the specific case of those in income poverty.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s12232-017-0274-7
Uncontrolled keywords: Happiness; Income; Inequality; Poverty
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Industrial Relations/HRM
Depositing User: Andrew Clark
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2018 10:23 UTC
Last Modified: 15 Jul 2019 08:22 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/69175 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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