Switchable Passive Wireless Vapour Sensors from Inkjet Printed Electronic Components on Poly (dimethylsiloxane)

Belsey, K.E. and Parry, A.V.S. and Rumens, C.V. and Ziai, Mohamed A. and Yeates, Stephen and Batchelor, John C. and Holder, Simon J. (2016) Switchable Passive Wireless Vapour Sensors from Inkjet Printed Electronic Components on Poly (dimethylsiloxane). In: NIP & Digital Fabrication Conference, 12 September 2016. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

A potential route to printed, inexpensive and disposable Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) sensor tags for chemical sensing such as the monitoring of food spoilage is described. The stimuli responsive material poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), is known to swell upon exposure to organic vapors. Colloidal silver ink solutions were printed and sintered onto surface modified PDMS to give conductive silver feed loops. These loops act as the active sensing component in antennae for passive (battery-free) (RFID) tags. When the tags were exposed to certain solvent vapors (e.g. ether, dichloromethane, acetaldehyde) the printed feed loop fractured. This was accompanied by a rapid increase in resistance and ultimately loss of conductivity. This led to a change in the transmitted power and read range of the wireless device. Remarkably upon removal from the vapor, the fractured feed loops reassemble and become conductive again, making them switchable and “multi-use”. The selectivity for the response to the vapors could be directly correlated to a function of the Hansen solubility parameters and vapor pressures of the solvents giving rise to the vapours. Significant differences in the solubility parameters between PDMS and the organic volatile and/or low vapor pressures lead to no significant response (e.g. methanol, acetic acid, popan-1-ol). This work paves the way to a fully inkjet printed RFID substrate for vapor detection.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Projects: [UNSPECIFIED] Sustainable Digital Fabrication of Low Energy Passive Wireless Sensors
Uncontrolled keywords: RFID, polymer sensor
Subjects: Q Science > QD Chemistry
T Technology > TA Engineering (General). Civil engineering (General) > TA 403 Materials Science
T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering > TK7800 Electronics (see also: telecommunications) > TK7871.6 Antennas and waveguides > TK7871.67.M53 Microwave antennas
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Engineering and Digital Arts
Faculties > Sciences > School of Engineering and Digital Arts > Broadband & Wireless Communications
Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences
Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Functional Materials Group
Depositing User: John Batchelor
Date Deposited: 17 May 2017 13:46 UTC
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2018 14:26 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/61762 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Batchelor, John C.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5139-5765
Holder, Simon J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8977-9257
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