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A Barrier to Medical Treatment? British Medical Practitioners, Medical Appliances and the Patent Controversy, 1870 – 1920

Jones, Claire (2016) A Barrier to Medical Treatment? British Medical Practitioners, Medical Appliances and the Patent Controversy, 1870 – 1920. British Journal for the History of Science, 49 (4). pp. 601-625. ISSN 0007-0874. (doi:10.1017/S000708741600114X) (KAR id:59784)

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Abstract

From the late nineteenth century onwards there emerged an increasingly diverse response to escalating patenting activity. Inventors were generally supportive of legislation that made patenting more accessible, while others, especially manufacturers, saw patenting culture as an impediment. The medical profession claimed that patenting represented ‘a barrier to medical treatment’ and was thus detrimental to the nation's health, yet, as I argue, the profession's development of strict codes of conduct forbidding practitioners from patenting resulted in rebellion from some members, who increasingly sought protection for their inventions. Such polarized opinions within the medical trade continue to affect current medical practice today.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1017/S000708741600114X
Subjects: D History General and Old World
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: M.R.L. Hurst
Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2017 14:14 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 16:13 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/59784 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Jones, Claire: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3228-3987
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