Musical and Non-Musical Involvement in Daily Life: The Case of Absorption

Herbert, Ruth (2012) Musical and Non-Musical Involvement in Daily Life: The Case of Absorption. Musicae Scientiae, 16 (1). pp. 41-66. ISSN 1029-8649. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/1029864911423161) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1029864911423161

Abstract

The construct of absorption (effortless engagement) has been the subject of a small number of disciplinespecific studies of involvement, including music. This paper reports the results of an empirical project that compared psychological qualities of absorption in everyday music listening scenarios with characteristics of non-music-related involvement. Absorption was located in “real-world” settings, and experiences across different activities in a variety of contexts were tapped as soon as possible after they occurred. The inquiry was designed to test two assumptions that have underpinned previous absorption research: first, that certain activities are inherently particularly absorbing; second, that absorption is best conceptualized primarily as a trait as opposed to a state. Twenty participants kept diaries for two weeks, recording descriptions of involving experiences of any kind. Eight weeks after submitting descriptive reports they completed the Modified Tellegen Absorption Scale (Jamieson, 2005). Diaries indicated that different activities shared a subset of involving features, and confirmed the importance of multi-sensory perception and the imaginative faculty to absorbed experiences. Music may be a particularly effective agent in the facilitation of absorption because it affords multiple potential entry points to involvement (acoustic attributes, source specification, entrainment, emotion, fusion of modalities) and because its semantic malleability makes it adaptable to a variety of circumstances. The MODTAS provided insufficient evidence for establishing correlations between state and trait absorption. It is argued that state and trait divisions are constructs that are inherently problematic.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: absorption, everyday listening, phenomenology, trance
Subjects: H Social Sciences
M Music and Books on Music
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of Music and Fine Art
Depositing User: Ruth Herbert
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2015 12:37 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Dec 2015 10:48 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53359 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):