Skip to main content

Invasion success of a global avian invader is explained by within-taxon niche structure and association with humans in the native range

Strubbe, Diederik, Jackson, Hazel, Groombridge, Jim J., Matthysen, Erik (2015) Invasion success of a global avian invader is explained by within-taxon niche structure and association with humans in the native range. Diversity and Distributions, 21 (6). pp. 675-685. ISSN 1366-9516. (doi:10.1111/ddi.12325) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

PDF - Publisher pdf
Restricted to Repository staff only
Contact us about this Publication Download (930kB)
[img]
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12325

Abstract

Aim To mitigate the threat invasive species pose to ecosystem functioning, reli- able risk assessment is paramount. Spatially explicit predictions of invasion risk obtained through bioclimatic envelope models calibrated with native species distribution data can play a critical role in invasive species management. Fore- casts of invasion risk to novel environments, however, remain controversial. Here, we assess how species’ association with human-modified habitats in the native range and within-taxon niche structure shape the distribution of invasive populations at biogeographical scales and influence the reliability of predictions of invasion risk. Location Africa, Asia and Europe. Methods We use ~1200 native and invasive ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri) occurrences and associated data on establishment success in combi- nation with mtDNA-based phylogeographic structure to assess niche dynam- ics during biological invasion and to generate predictions of invasion risk. Niche dynamics were quantified in a gridded environmental space while bioclimatic models were created using the biomod2 ensemble modelling framework. Results Ring-necked parakeets show considerable niche expansion into climates colder than their native range. Only when incorporating a measure of human modification of habitats within the native range do bioclimatic envelope mod- els yield credible predictions of invasion risk for parakeets across Europe. Inva- sion risk derived from models that account for differing niche requirements of phylogeographic lineages and those that do not achieve similar statistical accu- racy, but there are pronounced differences in areas predicted to be susceptible for invasion. Main conclusions Information on within-taxon niche structure and especially association with humans in the native range can substantially improve predic- tive models of invasion risk. To provide policymakers with robust predictions of invasion risk, including these factors into bioclimatic envelope models is recommended.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/ddi.12325
Uncontrolled keywords: Bioclimatic envelope models, human influence, invasive species, niche shift, Psittacula krameri, risk assessment.
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH324.2 Computational biology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH541 Ecology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Jim Groombridge
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2015 11:37 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:04 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/50690 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Jackson, Hazel: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9573-2025
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year