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Using molecular tools to guide management of invasive alien species: assessing the genetic impact of a recently introduced island bird population

Crommenacker, J van de, Bourgeois, Y. X. C., Warren, B. H., Jackson, H., Fleischer-Dogley, F., Groombridge, Jim J., Bunbury, N. (2015) Using molecular tools to guide management of invasive alien species: assessing the genetic impact of a recently introduced island bird population. Diversity and Distributions, 21 (12). pp. 1414-1427. ISSN 1366-9516. (doi:10.1111/ddi.12364) (KAR id:50664)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12364

Abstract

Aim: Biological invasions are a major threat to island biodiversity and are responsible for a large proportion of species declines and extinctions worldwide.

in the field. Molecular techniques, however, facilitate identification of specific hybridization events and assessment of the direction and timing of introgression. We use molecular markers to track hybridization in a population of an island endemic bird, the Aldabra fody (Foudia aldabrana), following the recent discovery of a co-occurring population of non-native Madagascar fodies (Foudia madagascariensis).

Location: Aldabra Atoll, Seychelles.

Methods: We combine phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear markers to assess whether hybridization has occurred between F. madagascariensis

originate from the neighbouring island of Assumption, where they were introduced in the 1970s.

Main conclusions: Our results validate the threat of losing the unique genetic diversity of F. aldabrana through admixture due to recent invasion of F. madagascariensis. We show that molecular analyses can be a valuable tool in formulating strategies for the management of invasive birds.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/ddi.12364
Uncontrolled keywords: avian conservation, biological invasions, coalescence analyses, fody, hybridiza-tion, invasive alien species, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH541 Ecology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: James Groombridge
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2015 14:52 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:03 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/50664 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Jackson, H.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9573-2025
Groombridge, Jim J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6941-8187
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