Changing Food Consumption Behaviors

Lowe, Ben and Souza-Monteiro, Diogo M. and Fraser, Iain M (2015) Changing Food Consumption Behaviors. Psychology & Marketing, 32 (5). pp. 481-485. ISSN 0742-6046. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/mar.20793) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.20793

Abstract

Few products are as pervasive and essential to our everyday lives as food: food fuels and satisfies our body, but also excites, disgusts, arouses, stimulates, and tantalizes all of our senses. It is functional and utilitarian, yet also hedonistic. Food consumption is also often a social act and our environment strongly influences what we consume. Yet, despite its obvious importance to us and our well-being, it appears that as a society the consumption of food has led to a variety of difficult challenges that require some level of behavior change by consumers. Though several decades of research have sought to find answers to the many food consumption challenges that exist, it appears that excessive consumption of the “wrong” foods and its consequences (e.g., obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, etc.) have begun to override prior concerns about food consumption deficit. Levels of obesity seem to be rising globally and apparently “no national success stories have been reported in the past 33 years” (Ng et al., 2014, p. 766).

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
H Social Sciences > HF Commerce
H Social Sciences > HF Commerce > HF5415 Marketing
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Marketing
Depositing User: Ben Lowe
Date Deposited: 22 Apr 2015 13:16 UTC
Last Modified: 23 Apr 2015 08:08 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/47834 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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