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Training staff to deliver alcohol screening and brief interventions: evaluation of accident and emergency staff attitudes

Perryman, K., Bland, M., Cassidy, P., Coulton, Simon, Deluca, P., Drummond, C., Gilverry, E., Godfrey, C., Heather, N., Kaner, E., and others. (2010) Training staff to deliver alcohol screening and brief interventions: evaluation of accident and emergency staff attitudes. In: Alcoholism-Clinical And Experimental Research. 34 (6). 229A-229A. (doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01210.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01210.x

Abstract

The SIPS study is a major UK evaluation of screening and brief intervention (SBI) strategies for alcohol users in primary care, emergency departments and criminal justice settings. This poster presents some preliminary data on the evaluation of training staff to screen patients for alcohol use disorders and deliver brief interventions in accident & emergency care. Training materials were developed and subject to revision by expert members of the SIPS teams and were piloted before use. Training was delivered in small groups or individually, and consisted of a 45 interactive presentation on screening for alcohol use disorders in accordance with the study protocol. The brief advice intervention training involved a 1 hour interactive presentation with skills practice role plays. The training package including a manual of the training with detailed procedures on delivering screening and brief intervention, flow chart of the screening and intervention process, copies of the presentations and intervention cheat sheets was given to each trainee. The training was evaluated in pre and post questionnaires measuring attitude and barriers to implementation. Overall, positive feedback on training was received and most welcomed receiving training. Research elements and Units were often reported as the most challenging parts of the training. Staff’s attitude and motivation were measured by the SAAPPQ which assesses differences in 5 areas: Role adequacy, Role legitimacy, Motivation, Task-specific self-esteem, Work satisfaction. Analysis of pre and post SAAPPQ scores has shown a significantly higher positive attitude and motivation (p < .001) of the 250 A&E staff involved in the trial (SAAPPQ) compared with staff from primary care and probation settings. This positive attitude also improved after training (p < .001). Despite willingness to be trained and positive attitudes towards SBI, implementation was difficult in the accident and emergency departments, and some settings needed external support to meet recruitment targets. Limited time, workload, lack of privacy and turnover were factors that implementation.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01210.x
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV5001 Alcohol use and miuse
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 27 Aug 2014 09:17 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 13:01 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/42701 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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