Consuming Higher Education: Why Learning Can't Be Bought

Williams, Joanna (2012) Consuming Higher Education: Why Learning Can't Be Bought. Continuum, New York, 208 pp. ISBN 978-1-4411-8360-6. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Consuming-Higher-Education...

Abstract

Consuming Higher Education explores the status of students within the university and society, and the funding and purpose of higher education, drawing on empirical data, UK and USA government policy documents, speeches by policy makers and media representations of students. Joanna Williams moves beyond the debates surrounding fees to consider the impact of the consumption model on universities, learning, knowledge, and student identity. While consumer status initially appears to empower students, Williams argues that it ultimately erodes students' autonomy and reduces learning to an instrumental focus on credit accumulation. At the same time, in giving students consumer status, lecturers are encouraged to avoid intellectually or emotionally challenging content so as not to upset student consumers, which could promote dissatisfaction. Williams draws these themes and arguments together to consider what it means to be a student and to explore alternative conceptions of higher education.

Item Type: Book
Subjects: L Education > LC Special aspects of education
Divisions: Faculties > University wide - Teaching/Research Groups > Centre for the Study of Higher Education
Depositing User: Joanna Williams
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2014 14:26 UTC
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2015 15:04 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/40836 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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