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Evaluation of a modified chronic disease self-management programme for people with intellectual disabilities

Wilson, Patricia M., Goodman, Claire M. (2011) Evaluation of a modified chronic disease self-management programme for people with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Nursing and Healthcare of Chronic Illness, 3 (3). pp. 310-318. ISSN 1752-9816. (doi:10.1111/j.1752-9824.2011.01105.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-9824.2011.01105.x

Abstract

Aim.? To evaluate an eight week chronic disease self-management programme adapted for people with moderate intellectual disabilities. Background.? People with intellectual disabilities are four times more likely to have a chronic disease than the rest of the population, have a shorter life expectancy and experience persistent problems in accessing health services. It is known that self-care underpins effective chronic disease management but there has been little work on facilitating self-care of chronic disease for people with intellectual disabilities. Methods.? A multiple case study design was used to evaluate four chronic disease self-management programmes across England. Data was collected in 2007 through semi-structured interviews and focus groups with tutors, service providers, participants and their carers, participants’ diaries and analysis of resource use. Results.? Forty one people with moderate intellectual disability completed the programme; 95% of those originally recruited. How people were identified and recruited to the programmes influenced group cohesion and satisfaction, and open self-referral raised issues for risk assessment. The findings suggest that a modified self-management programme is appropriate for people with moderate intellectual disabilities and can support self-management behaviour change. Tutors and organisers evaluated success in two discrete ways; behavioural changes or social outcomes such as increased social engagement. Conclusion.? The programme was accessible for people with moderate intellectual disabilities and can influence chronic disease self-management behaviours. To maximise participation, further development is required in tutor support and recruitment strategies. There is also a need to debate further the criteria for judging effectiveness for this population. Relevance to clinical practice.? A chronic disease self-management programme modified for people with intellectual disabilities can help this population manage their chronic disease and access health care.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/j.1752-9824.2011.01105.x
Uncontrolled keywords: chronic disease;expert patient;intellectual disabilities;self-management
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV1568 Disability studies
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2014 13:15 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 12:04 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/39071 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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