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Success and failure in integrated models of nursing for long term conditions: Multiple case studies of whole systems

Procter, Susan, Wilson, Patricia M., Brooks, Fiona, Kendall, Sally (2013) Success and failure in integrated models of nursing for long term conditions: Multiple case studies of whole systems. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50 (5). pp. 632-643. ISSN 0020-7489. (doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.10.007) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:39064)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.10.007

Abstract

Background: Current projections indicate that the UK faces a 252% increase in people aged

caseloads and clinics, working across sectors and organisational boundaries and as part of

demand. However, the evidence base informing the nursing role in managing LTC, the

relating to the infrastructure required to support cross organisational working, remains

Objectives: To explore, identify and characterise the origins, processes and outcomes of

models.

Settings: Two community matron services, two primary care (GP) practice nursing

across England and Wales.

the service, all patients and carers on the caseload, members of the multi-disciplinary

Methods: Semi-structured interviews with all participants, thematic analysis within a

Results: The study found high levels of clinical nursing expertise which in the case of the

primary care and hospital nurse specialist indicate similar levels of clinical expertise

experience fragmented care determined by diagnostic categories rather than patient need

are still organised around the impact on services and prevalence of disease at an individual

Conclusion: Nurses are making a major contribution to meeting the policy objectives for long

The scope of the nursing roles and services studied were idiosyncratic, opportunistic and

reactive, rather than planned and commissioned on an analysis of local population need.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.10.007
Uncontrolled keywords: Case study, Chronic care model, Chronic disease management, Community matron, Long term conditions, Nurse specialists, Primary care nursing, Whole systems analysis
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC952 Geriatrics
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2014 09:21 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:52 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/39064 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Wilson, Patricia M.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5787-9736
Kendall, Sally: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2507-0350
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