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The causal attributions of teaching staff toward children with intellectual disabilities: a comparison of vignettes depicting challenging behaviour with real incidents of challenging behaviour

Lucas, Victoria L., Collins, Suzanne, Langdon, Peter E. (2009) The causal attributions of teaching staff toward children with intellectual disabilities: a comparison of vignettes depicting challenging behaviour with real incidents of challenging behaviour. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 22 (1). pp. 1-9. ISSN 1360-2322. (doi:10.1111/j.1468-3148.2008.00428.x) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:36147)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-3148.2008.00428.x

Abstract

Background: We examined whether staff attributions, emotions and helping behaviours in reaction to ‘real’ incidents of challenging behaviour (CB) exhibited by children with intellectual disabilities were different from reactions to ‘vignettes’. We also examined whether these reactions are congruent with that predicted by attribution theory.

Methods: Using a repeated measures design, 60 staff working with children who have severe intellectual disabilities completed measures of cognition, emotion and helping behaviour in reaction to a ‘real’ incident of CB, and then completed the same measures in reaction to reading a ‘vignette’, that was matched to the ‘real’ incident of CB. There was a 2-week interval between the completion of measures in response to the ‘real’ incident of CB and the ‘vignette’.

Results: Correlational support was found for Weiner’s (1980) cognitive–emotional–action model of helping behaviour for measures completed in reaction to the ‘real’ incident of CB, regarding attributions of control only, but not for the ‘vignette’. There were significant differences between the correlations detected using ‘real’ incidents of CB in comparison to ‘vignettes’. Little evidence was found using both methods to support Weiner’s (1979) model of achievement motivation.

Conclusions: The results suggest that the relationships between constructs investigated using ‘vignettes’ is different from that detected when using ‘real’ incidents of CB, which has implications for psychological research that has used ‘vignettes’.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/j.1468-3148.2008.00428.x
Uncontrolled keywords: attribution theory; challenging behaviour; validity; vignettes
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Tizard
Depositing User: Peter Langdon
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2013 14:46 UTC
Last Modified: 21 Jun 2019 08:23 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/36147 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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