Teaching undergraduate marketing students using 'hot seating through puppetry': An exploratory study

Hardiman, Nigel and Pearce, Glenn (2012) Teaching undergraduate marketing students using 'hot seating through puppetry': An exploratory study. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 49 (4). pp. 437-447. ISSN 1470-3297. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2012.728379) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2012.728379

Abstract

Changes in preferred methods of learning among many students in recent years have challenged educators to introduce more interactive and experiential teaching methods. 'Hot seating' - where a person, such as an invited subject expert is interviewed by an audience - is a well-established interactive method of learning, but is often limited by availability of willing and suitable interviewees. In this exploratory study, university business undergraduates were required to interact with a lecturer-operated puppet representing a corporate client interviewee in a simulated sales presentation. Reflective diaries were used to gain insights into students' perceptions of this teaching technique. Results suggest that students: (i) gained practical business skills; (ii) were exposed to commercial responsibilities and (iii) assimilated relevant academic theory. Benefits and limitations of 'hot seating through puppetry' and its possible contribution to teaching and learning in a variety of contexts are discussed, together with suggestions for further research.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: drama; hot seating; puppets; role play; theatre
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: N.J. Hardiman
Date Deposited: 22 Jan 2013 14:57 UTC
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2013 08:01 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/33064 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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