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Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution

Hillier, LaDeana W, Miller, Webb, Birney, Ewan, Warren, Wesley, Hardison, Ross C, Ponting, Chris P, Bork, Peer, Burt, Peer, Groenen, Martien A M, Delany, Mary E, and others. (2004) Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution. Nature, 432 (7018). pp. 695-716. ISSN 0028-0836. (doi:10.1038/nature03154) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:106)

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Abstract

We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence and an estimated 20,000-23,000 genes--provides a new perspective on vertebrate genome evolution, while also improving the annotation of mammalian genomes. For example, the evolutionary distance between chicken and human provides high specificity in detecting functional elements, both non-coding and coding. Notably, many conserved non-coding sequences are far from genes and cannot be assigned to defined functional classes. In coding regions the evolutionary dynamics of protein domains and orthologous groups illustrate processes that distinguish the lineages leading to birds and mammals. The distinctive properties of avian microchromosomes, together with the inferred patterns of conserved synteny, provide additional insights into vertebrate chromosome architecture.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1038/nature03154
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Q Science > QL Zoology
Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems) > QP506 Molecular biology
S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > Biosciences
Signature Themes: Food Systems, Natural Resources and Environment
Depositing User: Mike Romanov
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2007 17:58 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2021 09:39 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/106 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Romanov, Michael N: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3584-4644
Griffin, Darren K.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7595-3226
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