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Abuse and Wellbeing of Long-Term Care Workers in the COVID-19 Era: Evidence from the UK

Saloniki, Eirini-Christina, Turnpenny, Agnes, Collins, Grace, Marchand, Catherine, Towers, Ann-Marie, Hussein, Shereen (2022) Abuse and Wellbeing of Long-Term Care Workers in the COVID-19 Era: Evidence from the UK. Sustainability, 14 (15). Article Number 9620. ISSN 2071-1050. (doi:10.3390/su14159620) (KAR id:96144)

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Abstract

The UK long-term care workforce has endured difficult working conditions for many years. During the pandemic, the sector faced unprecedented challenges, which further exacerbated these conditions and brought concerns about workplace abuse and violence. Such experiences can vary by personal and work characteristics, particularly affecting minority ethnic groups. They can subsequently impact workers’ wellbeing and the sector overall. Drawing on the first wave of a UK longitudinal workforce survey, this article examined the impact of COVID-19 on social care workers’ working conditions, general health and wellbeing, and intentions to leave the employer and sector altogether. The analysis is based on both quantitative and qualitative responses 1037 valid responses received between April and June 2021. The respondents were predominantly female, working in direct care roles and mainly serving older adults (including those with dementia). The findings highlighted worrying experiences of abuse in relation to COVID-19, which differed significantly by nationality, ethnicity and care settings. The analysis further showcased the negative impact of experienced abuse on work-life balance and intentions to leave the current employer or the care sector altogether. The findings emphasise the need for targeted measures that promote workers’ physical, emotional and financial wellbeing.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.3390/su14159620
Uncontrolled keywords: abuse; COVID-19; long-term care; wellbeing; workforce
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Personal Social Services Research Unit
Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Milly Massoura
Date Deposited: 09 Aug 2022 13:15 UTC
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2022 12:27 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/96144 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Collins, Grace: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0144-9411
Marchand, Catherine: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2092-9127
Towers, Ann-Marie: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3597-1061
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