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C-reactive protein and atrial fibrillation: Insights from epidemiological and Mendelian randomization studies

Li, Xintao, Peng, Shi, Wu, Xiaoyu, Guan, Bo, Tse, Gary, Chen, Songwen, Zhou, Genqing, Wei, Yong, Gong, Chao, Lu, Xiaofeng, and others. (2022) C-reactive protein and atrial fibrillation: Insights from epidemiological and Mendelian randomization studies. NMCD: Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases, 32 (6). pp. 1519-1527. ISSN 1590-3729. (doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2022.03.008) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:94831)

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Official URL:
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2022.03.008

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in atrial fibrillation (AF) from epidemiological and genetic perspectives. Individual-level data from the Kailuan cohort recruited between 2006 and 2017 were included. Serum CRP levels were measured at baseline and at biennial follow-up visits, and incident AF was ascertained from biennial 12-lead ECG assessment and medical records. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between baseline CRP levels or cumulative exposure to CRP and incident AF. A meta-analysis including nine prospective cohort studies and our current study was also conducted. Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis was performed to evaluate the aetiological role of CRP in AF. In our observational study (n = 86,424), high baseline CRP levels (>3 mg/L), compared with low CRP (<1 mg/L), were not significantly associated with AF risk (HR: 1.18; 95% CI: 0.99-1.40). High cumulative exposure to CRP (HR: 1.49; 95%CI: 1.01-2.21) was significantly associated with an increased risk of AF. Our meta-analysis suggested a positive association between elevated CRP levels and incident AF (relative risk: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.14-1.42). However, no significant association between genetically determined CRP and AF risk was observed in the MR analysis. Evidence from observational studies suggested that elevated serum CRP levels were positively associated with incident AF, while the causal effects of CRP on AF were not supported by the MR analysis. URL: https://www.chictr.org.cn; Unique identifier: ChiCTR-TNRC-11001489. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2022 The Italian Diabetes Society, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.]

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.numecd.2022.03.008
Additional information: ** From PubMed via Jisc Publications Router ** History: received 26-10-2021; revised 18-02-2022; accepted 04-03-2022.
Uncontrolled keywords: Risk assessment, Cumulative burden, Mendelian randomization, C-reactive protein, Atrial fibrillation
Subjects: R Medicine
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > Kent and Medway Medical School
Funders: National Natural Science Foundation of China (https://ror.org/01h0zpd94)
SWORD Depositor: JISC Publications Router
Depositing User: JISC Publications Router
Date Deposited: 22 Nov 2022 14:35 UTC
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2022 15:19 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/94831 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Tse, Gary: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5510-1253
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