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Politics, Security and the Construction of Protracted Social Conflicts. With special reference to the conflict between the Turkish State and the Kurdistan Workers' Party

de Carvalho Barrinha, Andre Filipe (2009) Politics, Security and the Construction of Protracted Social Conflicts. With special reference to the conflict between the Turkish State and the Kurdistan Workers' Party. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent. (doi:10.22024/UniKent/01.02.94197) (KAR id:94197)

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https://doi.org/10.22024/UniKent/01.02.94197

Abstract

This thesis offers a theoretical revision of Edward Azar’s Protracted Social Conflicts (PSCs) model under the light of a politically constructed world. It argues that politics, as a central element in the unfolding of an armed conflict, has to be understood by focusing on discursive practices that transform political issues into security issues - what the Copenhagen School calls a ‘securitisation process’. This thesis analyses how, in a PSC context, these processes take place, unfold and lead to the approval of exceptional measures that tend to be reified as part of the normal functioning of the political system. This normalisation of the exceptional creates additional barriers to the resolution of the conflict as it reifies discourses of 'otherness ’ as part of daily life. Overcoming these discourses and bringing the conflict ‘back’ to the political level, is also an important part of this research. The international dimension of these conflicts will also be analysed, particularly through the prism of the Regional Security Complex Theory. It will be seen how PSCs generate regional and international dynamics that go beyond the mainstream understanding of international relations. The conflict between the Turkish state and the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) will be used to illustrate and operationalise this thesis’ main arguments. Derived from this illustration and operationalisation it will be possible to provide new insights into this specific conflict. It will be analysed, among other things, how Turkey’s securitisation of the PKK evolved within a previously securitised context and, how that has led to the normalisation o f an aggressive political discourse, which has, until 2008, prevented the resolution of the conflict.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
Thesis advisor: Miall, Hugh
Thesis advisor: Hammerstad, Anne
DOI/Identification number: 10.22024/UniKent/01.02.94197
Additional information: This thesis has been digitised by EThOS, the British Library digitisation service, for purposes of preservation and dissemination. It was uploaded to KAR on 25 April 2022 in order to hold its content and record within University of Kent systems. It is available Open Access using a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-commercial, No Derivatives (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) licence so that the thesis and its author, can benefit from opportunities for increased readership and citation. This was done in line with University of Kent policies (https://www.kent.ac.uk/is/strategy/docs/Kent%20Open%20Access%20policy.pdf). If you feel that your rights are compromised by open access to this thesis, or if you would like more information about its availability, please contact us at ResearchSupport@kent.ac.uk and we will seriously consider your claim under the terms of our Take-Down Policy (https://www.kent.ac.uk/is/regulations/library/kar-take-down-policy.html).
Subjects: J Political Science
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
SWORD Depositor: SWORD Copy
Depositing User: SWORD Copy
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2022 16:24 UTC
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2022 16:24 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/94197 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)

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