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Balancing the urban stomach: public health, food selling and consumption in London, c. 1558-1640

Downes, Evana Frances (2022) Balancing the urban stomach: public health, food selling and consumption in London, c. 1558-1640. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent, Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS). (doi:10.22024/UniKent/01.02.93716) (KAR id:93716)

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https://doi.org/10.22024/UniKent/01.02.93716

Abstract

Until recently, public health histories have been predominantly shaped by medical and scientific perspectives, to the neglect of their wider social, economic and political contexts. These medically-minded studies have tended to present broad, sweeping narratives of health policy's explicit successes or failures, often focusing on extraordinary periods of epidemic disease viewed from a national context. This approach is problematic, particularly in studies of public health practice prior to 1800. Before the rise of modern scientific medicine, public health policies were more often influenced by shared social, cultural, economic and religious values which favoured maintaining hierarchy, stability and concern for 'the common good'. These values have frequently been overlooked by modern researchers. This has yielded pessimistic assessments of contemporary sanitation, implying that local authorities did not care about or prioritise the health of populations. Overly medicalised perspectives have further restricted historians' investigation and use of source material, their interpretation of multifaceted and sometimes contested cultural practices such as fasting, and their examination of habitual - and not just extraordinary - health actions. These perspectives have encouraged a focus on reactive - rather than preventative - measures.

This thesis contributes to a growing body of research that expands our restrictive understandings of pre-modern public health. It focuses on how public health practices were regulated, monitored and expanded in later Tudor and early Stuart London, with a particular focus on consumption and food-selling. Acknowledging the fundamental public health value of maintaining urban foodways, it investigates how contemporaries sought to manage consumption, food production waste, and vending practices in the early modern City's wards and parishes. It delineates the practical and political distinctions between food and medicine, broadly investigates the activities, reputations of and correlations between London's guild and itinerant food vendors and licensed and irregular medical practitioners, traces the directions in which different kinds of public health policy filtered up or down, and explores how policies were enacted at a national and local level. Finally, it compares and contrasts habitual and extraordinary public health regulations, with a particular focus on how perceptions of and actual food shortages, paired with the omnipresent threat of disease, impacted broader aspects of civic life.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
Thesis advisor: Richardson, Catherine
Thesis advisor: Fincham, Kenneth
DOI/Identification number: 10.22024/UniKent/01.02.93716
Uncontrolled keywords: public health; medicine; early modern; food history; social history; history of London; James I of England; Elizabeth I of England; Charles I of England; apothecaries; plague; bakers; butchers; College of Physicians; dearth; markets of London; food vendors
Subjects: D History General and Old World
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Arts and Humanities > School of History
Funders: Organisations -1 not found.
SWORD Depositor: System Moodle
Depositing User: System Moodle
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2022 13:10 UTC
Last Modified: 25 Mar 2022 09:35 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/93716 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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