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The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of screening and brief alcohol intervention to reduce alcohol consumption in young people in the high school setting: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (SIPS JR-HIGH).

Coulton, Simon, Giles, Emma L, McGeechan, Grant J, Deluca, Paolo, Drummond, Colin, Howel, Denise, Kaner, Eileen, McColl, Elaine, McGovern, Ruth, Scott, Stephanie, and others. (2022) The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of screening and brief alcohol intervention to reduce alcohol consumption in young people in the high school setting: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (SIPS JR-HIGH). Alcohol and Alcoholism, . ISSN 0735-0414. E-ISSN 1464-3502. (doi:10.1093/alcalc/agab087) (KAR id:93248)

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Official URL:
https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agab087

Abstract

Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of alcohol screening and brief intervention for adolescents delivered within the school setting. Method: Multi-centre, pragmatic, prospective randomised controlled trial conducted across different regions of England. We evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention (ASBI) in addition to Personal Health and Social Education (PHSE) compared to PHSE alone for adolescents aged 15 years in school. Our primary outcome was quantity of alcohol consumed at 12-months, assessed in units of alcohol. We also assessed alcohol-related problems, drinking motives and health and wellbeing. The trial was registered with current controlled trials (ISRCTN45691494). Results: While 60% of the study population had reduced their alcohol consumption at month 12, we found no difference in effectiveness between ASBI and PHSE for any of our outcome measures. The ASBI was not found to be cost-effective compared to PHSE. Conclusions: The results of the study suggest that it is not worthwhile implementing ASBI in a school setting. This concurs with other recent evidence of the effectiveness of ASBI for adolescent populations.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1093/alcalc/agab087
Uncontrolled keywords: randomised controlled trial, adolescent, alcohol, brief intervention, economic evaluation, school
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA790 Mental health
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Funders: National Institute for Health Research (https://ror.org/0187kwz08)
Depositing User: Simon Coulton
Date Deposited: 18 Feb 2022 10:54 UTC
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2022 12:27 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/93248 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Coulton, Simon: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7704-3274
Hendrie, Nadine: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6437-0826
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