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Marx on natural science

Reinfelder, Monika (1985) Marx on natural science. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent. (doi:10.22024/UniKent/01.02.93146) (KAR id:93146)

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Official URL:
https://doi.org/10.22024/UniKent/01.02.93146

Abstract

This thesis begins with biographical details of Marx's studies of natural science and, before looking at Marx's theorisation of the latter, reconstructs the theorisation of natural science within the Marxist tradition. Marx's own theorisation of natural science is placed within the context of his materialist conception of history which states the thesis that "social being determines consciousness". Consciousness, including natural science, is located within specific social relations of production. The thesis concentrates on Marx's Critique of Political Economy by contextualising natural science within Marx's analysis of capitalist relations of production, the basis of which is, for Marx, the value-form, leading to the capitalform. The letter's development, capital accumulation, is dependent on the extraction of surplus-value through the "real subsumption of labour under capital". This is achieved via the practical application of natural science in the form of technology in the production process. Thus, the development of natural science is theorised in direct connection with the extraction of surplus-value. Given the direct link of natural science with the extraction of surplus- value, it is inferred that natural science has been, and continues to be, developed by and for the needs of capital. The thesis concludes: the capital-form stamps its mark on our knowledge of nature and production; thus, natural science cannot be viewed as an autonomous force independent of the social relations it finds itself in.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
DOI/Identification number: 10.22024/UniKent/01.02.93146
Additional information: This thesis has been digitised by EThOS, the British Library digitisation service, for purposes of preservation and dissemination. All theses digitised by EThOS are protected by copyright and other relevant Intellectual Property Rights. They are made available to users under a non-exclusive, non-transferable licence under which they may use or reproduce, in whole or in part, material for valid purposes, providing the copyright owners are acknowledged using the normal conventions. If you think that your rights are compromised by open access to this thesis, or if you would like more information about its availability, please contact us at ResearchSupport@kent.ac.uk and we will seriously consider your claim under the terms of our Take-Down Policy.
Subjects: J Political Science
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: Suzanne Duffy
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2022 15:05 UTC
Last Modified: 20 Dec 2022 15:59 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/93146 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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