Skip to main content

Evolution of Beak and Feather Disease Virus across Three Decades of Conservation Intervention for Population Recovery of the Mauritius Parakeet

Fogell, Deborah J., Tollington, Simon, Tatayah, Vikash, Henshaw, Sion, Naujeer, Houshna, Jones, Carl, Raisin, Claire, Greenwood, Andrew, Groombridge, Jim J. (2021) Evolution of Beak and Feather Disease Virus across Three Decades of Conservation Intervention for Population Recovery of the Mauritius Parakeet. Diversity, 13 (11). ISSN 1424-2818. (doi:doi.org /10.3390/d13110584) (KAR id:91462)

PDF Publisher pdf
Language: English


Download (3MB) Preview
[thumbnail of Groombridge - published version.pdf]
Preview
This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.
Request an accessible format
PDF Author's Accepted Manuscript
Language: English

Restricted to Repository staff only

Contact us about this Publication
[thumbnail of manuscript.v7_JG_for KAR (2).pdf]
Official URL
https://doi.org /10.3390/d13110584

Abstract

Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are key contributors to the current global biodiversity crisis. Psittaciformes (parrots) are one of the most vulnerable avian taxa and psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD) is the most common viral disease in wild parrots. PBFD is caused by the beak and feather disease virus (BFDV), which belongs to the Circoviridae family and comprises a circular, single-stranded DNA genome. BFDV is considered to have spread rapidly across the world and, in 2005, an outbreak of PBFD was documented in the recovering population of the Mauritius parakeet (Alexandrinus eques). The Mauritius parakeet was once the world’s rarest parrot and has been successfully recovered through 30 years of intensive conservation management. Molecular sur-veillance for the prevalence of BFDV was carried out across a 24-year sample archive spanning the period from 1993 to 2017, and DNA sequencing of positive individuals provided an opportunity to assess patterns of phylogenetic and haplotype diversity. Phylogenetic analyses show variation in the extent of viral diversification within the replicase protein (Rep). Timeseries of BFDV preva-lence and number of haplotypes reveal that two subsequent waves of infection occurred in 2010/2011 and 2013/2014 following the initial outbreak in 2005. Continued disease surveillance to determine the frequency and intensity of subsequent waves of infection may benefit future translocation/reintroduction planning. The continued growth of the Mauritius parakeet popula-tion despite the presence of BFDV bodes well for its long-term persistence.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: doi.org /10.3390/d13110584
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Jim Groombridge
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2021 09:56 UTC
Last Modified: 07 Jan 2022 10:59 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/91462 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Groombridge, Jim J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6941-8187
  • Depositors only (login required):