Skip to main content

Meeting ultraviolet B radiation requirements of amphibians in captivity: A case study with mountain chicken frogs (Leptodactylus fallax) and general recommendations for pre-release health screening

Tapley, B., Rendle, M., Baines, F.M., Goetz, M., Bradfield, K.S., Rood, D., Lopez, J., Garcia, G., Routh, A. (2014) Meeting ultraviolet B radiation requirements of amphibians in captivity: A case study with mountain chicken frogs (Leptodactylus fallax) and general recommendations for pre-release health screening. Zoo Biology, 34 . pp. 46-52. ISSN 1098-2361. (doi:10.1002/zoo.21170) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:90587)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided.
Official URL:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/zo...

Abstract

Conservation breeding programmes are a tool used to prevent amphibian extinctions. The husbandry requirements of amphibians are complex. Ongoing research is needed to ensure optimal management of those captive-bred animals destined, in particular, for reintroduction. The UV-B and vitamin D3 requirements of amphibians are largely unknown. Metabolic bone disease has been reported in a number of species. These include the Critically Endangered mountain chicken frog (Leptodactylus fallax) reared in captivity on diets supplemented with a high-calcium multivitamin and mineral supplement containing vitamin D3 but without UV-B provision. Captive-bred L. fallax being reared for reintroduction to Montserrat were provided with UV-B radiation from metamorphosis and were fed on insects supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Overlapping heat, light and UV-B gradients were provided, mimicking what we believe best represents the natural situation and thereby facilitated self-regulation of UV-B exposure. A subset of 10 frogs was periodically radiographed to assess skeletal health. Radiographic bone density and anatomical integrity appeared unremarkable when compared with a wild caught L. fallax. In addition to other routine health-screening, we recommend that radiography be performed to a structured schedule on a subset of all captive-bred and reared amphibians to assess skeletal health and to gauge the appropriateness of captive husbandry. We demonstrate here that, through the appropriate provision of a combination of both UV-B radiation and dietary supplementation, L. fallax can be bred and reared in captivity with healthy skeletal development.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/zoo.21170
Uncontrolled keywords: Leptodactylus fallax, UV-B, amphibian, conservation, husbandry
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Benjamin Tapley
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2021 09:49 UTC
Last Modified: 17 Aug 2022 11:02 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/90587 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Tapley, B.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9787-3793
Baines, F.M.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8063-6134
Garcia, G.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3007-8998
  • Depositors only (login required):