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Interpersonal violence in a deprived Scottish urban area with aggregations of physical health risks and psychiatric morbidity: an ecological study

Coid, Jeremy, zhang, Yingzhe, Ullrich, Simone, Wood, Jane L., Bhavsar, Vishal, Bebbington, Paul, Bhui, Kamaldeep (2021) Interpersonal violence in a deprived Scottish urban area with aggregations of physical health risks and psychiatric morbidity: an ecological study. BMC Public Health, . pp. 1-18. E-ISSN 1471-2458. (doi:10.1186/s12889-021-11167-z) (KAR id:89530)

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Official URL:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-11167-z

Abstract

Background: Glasgow, Scotland, has previously shown exceptional levels of violence among young men, shows

aggregations of health conditions, with shortened life expectancy. Health conditions can be both causes and

consequences of violence, of shared community-level socio-economic risk factors, and can result from large-scale

social forces beyond the control of populations with high levels of violence. The aim of the study was to provide

an in depth understanding of the Public Health problem of violence among young adult men in Glasgow East.

Method: Ecological investigation of violence and its associations with health conditions in areas of contrasting

socioeconomic deprivation. National survey of 1916 British men aged 18–34 years, augmented by a sub-sample of

765 men in Glasgow East (GE). Participants completed questionnaires covering current physical and sexual health,

psychiatric symptoms, substance misuse, lifestyle, and crime and violence.

Results: The 5-year prevalence of violence was similar in both surveys but fights involving weapons (AOR 3.32, 95%

CI 2.29–4.79), gang fights (AOR 2.30, 95% CI 1.77–2.98), and instrumental violence supporting criminal lifestyles were

more common in GE, where 1 in 9 men had been in prison. Violent men in both samples reported poorer physical

and sexual health and all types of psychiatric morbidity except depression, with multiple high-risk behaviours for

both future poor health and violence. Associations between drug and alcohol dependence and violence in GE

could not be entirely explained by deprivation.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1186/s12889-021-11167-z
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Jane Wood
Date Deposited: 30 Jul 2021 15:12 UTC
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2022 23:13 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/89530 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Wood, Jane L.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4173-410X
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