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Integrated dementia care: A qualitative evidence synthesis of the experiences of people living with dementia, informal carers and healthcare professionals

Smith, Raymond, Martin, Anne, Wright, Toni, Hulbert, Sabina, Hatziminaoglou, Eleni (2021) Integrated dementia care: A qualitative evidence synthesis of the experiences of people living with dementia, informal carers and healthcare professionals. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 97 . ISSN 0167-4943. (KAR id:89407)

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https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2021.104471

Abstract

Background: In order to provide improved care provision, integrated care services are being developed. However, little is known about how people living with dementia, their families and healthcare professionals experience integrated care. Therefore, the purpose of this review of the qualitative literature was to examine the experiences and perceptions of integrated dementia care. Methods: This qualitative review synthesised findings from included studies identified from a comprehensive literature search. Searches included: five electronic databases, journal handsearching, and reference list searching of relevant literature reviews and the final included studies. Findings: Three overarching themes were identified: 1) Ways of working which facilitate the delivery of integrated dementia care; 2) Informal carers as equal partners in care provision and decision making; and 3) Challenges leading to fragmented and disjointed integrated dementia care. For integrated care to be successful, communication and collaboration between healthcare professionals, and the involvement of informal carers is needed. Multidisciplinary teams and employing case managers to coordinate care provision can improve communication and collaboration. However, distrust between healthcare professionals and a lack of a central database to access and share information often hinders the development of integrated dementia care service provision. Conclusion: Integrated dementia care can be successful and well received by people living with dementia and their families when certain conditions are met. However, given the negative consequences fragmented and disjointed care can have on people living with dementia and their families, action is needed to further support the development of integrated dementia care services.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Dementia Integrated care Care homes Caregivers Healthcare professionals Evidence synthesis
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Central Services
Depositing User: Helen Wooldridge
Date Deposited: 22 Jul 2021 08:07 UTC
Last Modified: 27 Jul 2021 08:09 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/89407 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Hulbert, Sabina: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3247-7271
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