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Texas Ranger Auxiliaries: Double-Edged Sword of the Campaign for Northern Mexico, 1846–1848

Jennings, Nathan A. (2015) Texas Ranger Auxiliaries: Double-Edged Sword of the Campaign for Northern Mexico, 1846–1848. Small Wars & Insurgencies, 26 (2). pp. 313-334. ISSN 0959-2318. (doi:10.1080/09592318.2015.1007560) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:88220)

Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1080/09592318.2015.1007560

Abstract

This essay explores how federalized Texas Rangers, in the form of scout companies and larger mounted rifle regiments, provided controversial, and ultimately cost-effective, versatility to the US Army during its campaign in Northern Mexico between 1846 and 1848. It argues that their contributions centered on three tactical tasks that enhanced the invading army's maneuvers: reconnaissance, direct assault, and counterguerrilla patrolling. Each of these actions reflected a distinctive skill-set at which the auxiliaries excelled, marking them as exceptionally multifunctional assets. The Texans' augmentation coincided with, and was necessitated by, the evolving stages of the war in Northern Mexico, beginning with the American army's initial invasion, then transitioning to the assault on Monterrey, and finally ending with a troubled occupation where the rangers' brutality both enabled and undermined American pacification efforts.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/09592318.2015.1007560
Uncontrolled keywords: counterguerrilla warfare, Federacion Hill, Mexican War, Monterrey, Maj. Gen. Zachary Taylor, Texas Devils, Texas Rangers
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Arts and Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Nathan Jennings
Date Deposited: 18 May 2021 11:53 UTC
Last Modified: 18 May 2021 11:53 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/88220 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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