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Extremely potent human monoclonal antibodies from COVID-19 convalescent patients

Andreano, Emanuele, Nicastri, Emanuele, Paciello, Ida, Pileri, Piero, Manganaro, Noemi, Piccini, Giulia, Manenti, Alessandro, Pantano, Elisa, Kabanova, Anna, Troisi, Marco, and others. (2021) Extremely potent human monoclonal antibodies from COVID-19 convalescent patients. Cell, . ISSN 0092-8674. E-ISSN 1097-4172. (doi:10.1016/j.cell.2021.02.035) (KAR id:86752)

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https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2021.02.035

Abstract

Human monoclonal antibodies are safe, preventive and therapeutic tools, that can be rapidly developed to help restore the massive health and economic disruption caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. By single cell sorting 4,277 SARS-CoV-2 spike protein specific memory B cells from 14 COVID-19 survivors, 453 neutralizing antibodies were identified. The most potent neutralizing antibodies recognized the spike protein receptor binding domain, followed in potency by antibodies that recognize the S1 domain, the spike protein trimer and the S2 subunit. Only 1.4% of them neutralized the authentic virus with a potency of 1-10 ng/mL. The most potent monoclonal antibody, engineered to reduce the risk of antibody dependent enhancement and prolong half-life, neutralized the authentic wild type virus and emerging variants containing D614G, E484K and N501Y substitutions. Prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in the hamster model was observed at 0.25 and 4 mg/kg respectively in absence of Fc-functions.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.cell.2021.02.035
Uncontrolled keywords: SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, monoclonal antibodies, prophylaxis, therapy, emerging variants, Fc functions absence
Subjects: Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR355 Virology
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > Medway School of Pharmacy
Depositing User: Nigel Temperton
Date Deposited: 24 Feb 2021 07:26 UTC
Last Modified: 12 Mar 2021 13:34 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/86752 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Temperton, Nigel: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7978-3815
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