Skip to main content

Comparing the utility of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Belief Model in understanding and promoting the use of protective helmets among school-age cyclists

Arnold, Laurence (1997) Comparing the utility of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Belief Model in understanding and promoting the use of protective helmets among school-age cyclists. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent. (doi:10.22024/UniKent/01.02.86131) (KAR id:86131)

PDF
Language: English


Download (21MB) Preview
[thumbnail of DX225051.pdf]
Preview
This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.
Request an accessible format
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.22024/UniKent/01.02.86131

Abstract

The thesis set out to compare the Health Belief Model (Rosenstock, 1966, 1974) and the Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzenm 1985,1991) in terms of their usefulness in understanding and predicting health behaviour and their ability to guide the construction of effective behaviour change interventions. The models were used to investigate the beliefs associated with the use of protective helmets amongst school-age cyclists in order to design and evaluate an intervention aimed at promoting the use of helmets by students while cycling to and from school. To aid comparison, the Health Belief Model (HBM) included a meausre of behavioural intention mediating between beliefs and behavour.

In the first of two prospective studies, the models successfully predicted helmet use amongst a sample of teenager boys while cycling to and from school and identified beliefs discriminating between helmet users and non-users. A second longitudinal study limited the influence of past behaviour by predicting helmet use among secondary school girls and boys from beliefs assessed at junior school before they began cycling to and from school. These studies confirmed the predictive utility of the models and showed the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) superior to the HBM in terms of predictive power, conceptual strengths and sufficiency. The third study used the beliefs identified as most salient by the TPB to inform a persuasive intervention based upon the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion (Petty and Cacioppo, 1986), intended to promoted the use of helmets. A series of persuasive messages, presented to non-helmeted cyclists, suceeded in promoting positive beliefs and intentions vis a vis helmet use while cycling to and from school and brought about a 25% increase in helmet use. Both effects were sustained over time. This programme of research confirmed the explanatory power of the TPB for predicting health behaviour.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
DOI/Identification number: 10.22024/UniKent/01.02.86131
Additional information: This thesis has been digitised by EThOS, the British Library digitisation service, for purposes of preservation and dissemination. It was uploaded to KAR on 09 February 2021 in order to hold its content and record within University of Kent systems. It is available Open Access using a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-commercial, No Derivatives (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) licence so that the thesis and its author, can benefit from opportunities for increased readership and citation. This was done in line with University of Kent policies (https://www.kent.ac.uk/is/strategy/docs/Kent%20Open%20Access%20policy.pdf). If you feel that your rights are compromised by open access to this thesis, or if you would like more information about its availability, please contact us at ResearchSupport@kent.ac.uk and we will seriously consider your claim under the terms of our Take-Down Policy (https://www.kent.ac.uk/is/regulations/library/kar-take-down-policy.html).
Uncontrolled keywords: Teenagers; Cycling; Theory of Planned Behaviour; Health Belief Model; Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
SWORD Depositor: SWORD Copy
Depositing User: SWORD Copy
Date Deposited: 29 Oct 2019 16:29 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2021 10:27 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/86131 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):