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Hypervelocity Impacts on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels Filled with Shear Thickening Fluid

Warren, Justin, Colechin, Mike, Offenberger, Sean, Kota, Kalyan Raj, Lacey, Thomas E., Toghiani, Hossein, Burchell, Mark, Kundu, Santanu, Pittman Jnr, Charles U. (2020) Hypervelocity Impacts on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels Filled with Shear Thickening Fluid. International Journal of Impact Engineering, 150 . Article Number 103803. ISSN 0734-743X. (doi:10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2020.103803) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:85938)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2020.103803

Abstract

The use of honeycomb core sandwich panels filled with a shear thickening fluid (STF) as a component of spacecraft micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) shielding was investigated using hypervelocity impact (HVI) testing. Incorporating a STF into shielding has the potential to reduce damage to the core and the likelihood of back-side facesheet perforation in the event of a HVI. The sandwich panels tested consisted of 1.27 cm thick hexagonal aluminum honeycomb core bonded between 0.064 cm thick aluminum facesheets. The STF displayed a marked rise in viscosity with increasing shear rate above a critical shear rate. It was based on low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) and hydrophilic fumed silica. Sandwich panel target specimens filled with the STF were subjected to HVIs by 1 mm diameter stainless steel spheres at nominal temperatures of -80◦C or 21◦C with nominal impact velocities of 4.8 km/s or 6.8 km/s. Additional specimens filled with PEG only were also impacted for comparison. Visual inspections and X-ray computerized tomography were used to assess impact damage. All of the panels experienced perforation of the impacted facesheet, facesheet bulging, localized delamination, and the formation of a cavity in the damaged core. STF-filled panels sustained significantly less damage than PEG-filled panels. None of the STF-filled panels were completely perforated during impact. In contrast, one of the PEG-filled panels impacted at the peak velocity was perforated. The remaining PEG-filled panel sustained substantially more honeycomb core damage and facesheet-core delamination compared to an analogous STF-filled panel. Sandwich panels filled with the STF provide superior HVI mitigation in comparison to panels filled with a Newtonian fluid (i.e., PEG). These experiments show that incorporation of STFs into MMOD shielding components has the po-tential to dramatically improve the HVI penetration resistance over a broad range of impact velocities and temperatures

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2020.103803
Uncontrolled keywords: Hypervelocity impacts, Shear-thickening fluids, Sandwich panels
Subjects: Q Science > QB Astronomy
Q Science > QC Physics
T Technology > TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > Physics and Astronomy
Depositing User: Mark Burchell
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2021 13:47 UTC
Last Modified: 03 Sep 2021 14:00 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/85938 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Burchell, Mark: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2680-8943
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