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The Acute Physiological and Perceptual Effects of Individualizing the Recovery Interval Duration Based Upon the Resolution of Muscle Oxygen Consumption During Cycling Exercise

Fennell, Christopher, Hopker, James (2021) The Acute Physiological and Perceptual Effects of Individualizing the Recovery Interval Duration Based Upon the Resolution of Muscle Oxygen Consumption During Cycling Exercise. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, . ISSN 1555-0265. E-ISSN 1555-0273. (doi:10.1123/ijspp.2020-0295) (KAR id:85823)

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https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2020-0295

Abstract

Purpose: There has been paucity in research investigating the individualization of recovery interval duration during cycling-based high-intensity interval training (HIIT). The main aim of the study was to investigate whether individualizing the duration of the recovery interval based upon the resolution of muscle oxygen consumption would improve the performance during work intervals and the acute physiological response of the HIIT session, when compared with a standardized (2:1 work recovery ratio) approach. Methods: A total of 16 well-trained cyclists (maximal oxygen consumption: 60 [7] mL·kg−1·min−1) completed 6 laboratory visits: (Visit 1) incremental exercise test, (Visit 2) determination of the individualized (IND) recovery duration, using the individuals’ muscle oxygen consumption recovery duration to baseline from a 4- and 8-minute work interval, (Visits 3–6) participants completed a 6 × 4- and a 3 × 8-minute HIIT session twice, using the IND and standardized recovery intervals. Results: Recovery duration had no effect on the percentage of the work intervals spent at >90% and >95% of maximal oxygen consumption, maximal minute power output, and maximal heart rate, during the 6 × 4- and 3 × 8-minute HIIT sessions. Recovery duration had no effect on mean work interval power output, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood lactate, and rating of perceived exertion. There were no differences in reported session RPE between recovery durations for the 6 × 4- and 3 × 8-minute HIIT sessions. Conclusion: Individualizing HIIT recovery duration based upon the resolution of muscle oxygen consumption to baseline levels does not improve the performance of the work intervals or the acute physiological response of the HIIT session, when compared with standardized recovery duration.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1123/ijspp.2020-0295
Uncontrolled keywords: high-intensity interval training; recovery prescription; near-infrared spectroscopy; time at VO2max
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation. Leisure > Sports sciences
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: James Hopker
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2021 12:44 UTC
Last Modified: 18 Jun 2021 15:48 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/85823 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Hopker, James: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4786-7037
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