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Crime and crime reduction: The importance of group processes

Wood, Jane L. and Gannon, Theresa A., eds. (2013) Crime and crime reduction: The importance of group processes. Routledge, Hove, 206 pp. ISBN 978-1-84872-083-1. E-ISBN 978-0-203-09769-4. (doi:10.4324/9780203097694) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:85821)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/crime-crime-re...

Abstract

As social beings, people are bound by their membership of groups. So it comes as no real surprise that they also commit crime in groups. However, there are many questions regarding group crime that we still cannot answer with any real certainty. For instance, does group membership mean that people who would not normally commit crimes become more likely to do so because of the influence of their group? If so, does this mean that membership of a criminally active group causes people to become criminal or does the group act as a support system that fosters people’s pre-existing criminal inclinations? And, how is it that group membership exerts such a strong hold on people that some risk imprisonment or even death, rather than relinquish that membership?

This book sheds light on these and other questions to deepen our understanding of group processes in criminal activity and in the treatment of offenders’ thoughts and behavior. We begin by providing social psychological explanations of how groups influence individuals. We then move on to consider specific forms of group crime such as terrorism, street and prison gangs, organized criminal networks and group sexual offending. In our final two chapters we discuss first, the role that groups take in the treatment of offenders to reduce offending and second, why it is that existing group membership needs to be considered if we are to be successful in treating offenders and reducing crime.

Item Type: Edited book
DOI/Identification number: 10.4324/9780203097694
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Jane Wood
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2021 12:17 UTC
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2021 11:07 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/85821 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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