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Comic Nihilism in Expensive People by Joyce Carol Oates: The Self-invention through the Lens of Postmodern Nietzsche

Horvath, Dorota (2020) Comic Nihilism in Expensive People by Joyce Carol Oates: The Self-invention through the Lens of Postmodern Nietzsche. In: Zriba, Hassen, ed. Postmodernism and Narratives of Erasure in Culture, Literature, and Language. Academica Press, Washington,DC, USA. ISBN 978-1-68053-950-9. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:85519)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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http://www.academicapress.com/node/448

Abstract

This article discusses the aesthetics of self-invention in light of a postmodern reading of Nietzsche in Expensive People (1970) by Nobel Prize nominee Joyce Carol Oates (1938- ). In contrast to the innocent heroine of Lewis Carroll’s Wonderland texts that influenced the imagery of Oates’ second text of her Wonderland Quartet, the protagonist in Expensive People is a young boy whose innocence is playfully turned into violence to advance the chaotic setting of the postmodern narrative. The philosophical logic behind both of Carroll’s books and Oates’ Wonderland Quartet resembles the postmodern sentiment that appropriates by Friedrich Nietzsche’s principle of identity after the proclamation of the death of God. Albeit the dramatisation of the philosophical conflict of the death of God and the subsequent aspect of nihilist erasure, the postmodern reading of Expensive People unfolds the aestheticisation of decentralisation.

Item Type: Book section
Uncontrolled keywords: Nietzsche, postmodernism, nihilism, self-invention, erasure, Wonderland
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Arts and Humanities > School of English
Depositing User: Dorota Horvath
Date Deposited: 13 Jan 2021 19:55 UTC
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2021 17:04 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/85519 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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