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Affective Governmentality: Governing Through Disgust in Uganda

Ashworth, Michael (2017) Affective Governmentality: Governing Through Disgust in Uganda. Social & Legal Studies, 26 (2). pp. 188-207. ISSN 0964-6639. (doi:10.1177/0964663916666630) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:84757)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1177/0964663916666630

Abstract

This article questions the extent to which calculable numbers are indispensable to the government of conduct. By focusing on the role played by disgust in the government of sexual minorities in Uganda, it provides an account of government by emotion, or affective governmentality. This article draws on the literature on disgust, appropriating elements from the various disciplines and perspectives and bringing them under a Foucauldian umbrella. It explores two techniques through which attempts were made to arouse disgust: the sermon and the tabloid exposé. Although such techniques were performed by agents who operated beyond the state, this article contends that the emergence of the Anti-Homosexuality Act 2014 cannot be accounted for without considering the role played by disgust.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/0964663916666630
Uncontrolled keywords: Affect, Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009, Anti-Homosexuality Act 2014, disgust, Foucault, LGBT, sexual minorities, techniques of government, Uganda
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > Kent Law School
Depositing User: Michael Ashworth
Date Deposited: 11 Dec 2020 16:39 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 14:17 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/84757 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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