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Perivitelline threads in cleavage-stage human embryos: observations using time-lapse imaging

Kellam, Louise, Pastorelli, Laura M., Bastida, Angel M., Senkbeil, Amy, Montgomery, Sue, Fishel, Simon, Campbell, Alison (2017) Perivitelline threads in cleavage-stage human embryos: observations using time-lapse imaging. Reproductive BioMedicine Online, 35 (6). pp. 646-656. ISSN 1472-6483. (doi:10.1016/j.rbmo.2017.09.004) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:84036)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2017.09.004

Abstract

Time-lapse imaging of the human preimplantation embryo in vitro has revealed a transient phenomenon involving the appearance of perivitelline threads, commonly observed at the two-cell stage. These threads span the perivitelline space, arising at the specific area where the cytoplasmic membrane contacts the zona pellucida, before any perivitelline space is formed. The threads persist as the cytoplasmic membrane retracts from the zona pellucida to form the first cleavage furrow. In this observational report, these structures and their incidence are described. A total of 834 time-lapse videos from IVF treatment cycles, one per patient, were retrospectively analysed for perivitelline threads, from pronuclear formation until completion of the first cell cycle. Threads were observed in 56.4% (470/834) of embryos and varied from a single to an array spanning an area of the zona pellcida. A total of 91.9% (432/470) were seen to form after cytoplasmic membrane–zona-pellucida contact. A total of 76.4% (359/470) were visible at the first cleavage furrow; 77% (362/470) were associated with cytoplasmic fragments at the two-cell-stage. Presence or absence of threads did not affect embryo development. This descriptive study is limited; further characterization of these structures is needed to elucidate their potential role in early human embryo development.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.rbmo.2017.09.004
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: Alison Campbell
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2020 12:39 UTC
Last Modified: 10 Nov 2020 12:39 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/84036 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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