Making Sense of Modernity's Maladies: Health and Disease in the Industrial Revolution

Brown, Michael F. (2006) Making Sense of Modernity's Maladies: Health and Disease in the Industrial Revolution. Endeavour, 30 (3). pp. 108-112. ISSN 0160-9327. E-ISSN 1873-1929. (doi:10.1016/j.endeavour.2006.08.001) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.endeavour.2006.08.001

Abstract

The industrialization and urbanization of Britain during the 19th century gave the medical profession something to think about. In particular, were the radical changes taking place in society responsible for the sudden rise in endemic and epidemic disease? This article (part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) examines the reactions of two key figures in the history of British public health, James Philips Kay and Thomas Southwood Smith, to this question. Their outlooks typify the tendency of Victorian medical practitioners to construct economies of health that saw disease as a consequence of the violation of natural laws and cycles rather than as a product of industrial modernity.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General) > D204 Modern History
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: L.J. Brown
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2007 18:32
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2016 14:21
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/840 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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