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Early regulatory problems and parenting: life-long risk, vulnerability or susceptibility for attention, internalizing and externalizing outcomes?

Jaekel, Julia, Sorg, Christian, Breeman, Linda, Baumann, Nicole, Bilgin, Ayten, Bäuml, Josef G., Wolke, Dieter (2020) Early regulatory problems and parenting: life-long risk, vulnerability or susceptibility for attention, internalizing and externalizing outcomes? European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, . ISSN 1018-8827. E-ISSN 1018-8827. (doi:10.1007/s00787-020-01632-2) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:82893)

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https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-020-01632-2

Abstract

Multiple or persistent crying, sleeping, or feeding problems in early childhood (regulatory problems, RPs) predict increased risk for self-regulation difficulties. Sensitive parenting may protect children from trajectories of dysregulation. Considering self-regulation from a life-course perspective, are children with early multiple and/or persistent RPs affected similarly by parenting as those without (main effects model, ME), or are they more vulnerable (diathesis-stress, DIA-S), or more susceptible (differential susceptibility theory, DST) to variations in sensitive parenting at age 6 years? Participants (N = 302) were studied prospectively from birth to 28 years. RPs were assessed from 5 to 56 months. Sensitive parenting was observed at 6 years. Attention regulation was observed at 8 and 28 years. Internalizing and externalizing problems were rated by parents at 8 years, and by adults at 28 years. Confirmatory-comparative modelling tested whether associations of sensitive parenting with outcomes at 8 and 28 years among individuals with early multiple and/or persistent RPs (n = 74) versus those without (n = 228) were best explained by ME, DIA-S, or DST models. Best fitting models differed according to age at assessment. For childhood attention regulation, the statistically parsimonious DIA-S provided the best fit to the data. At age 28, two additive main effects (ME, RP group and sensitive parenting) fit best. DIA-S and ME explained internalizing and externalizing problems. Using a comprehensive life-span approach, DIA-S and ME models but not DST explained how early RPs and sensitive parenting predicted attention, internalizing, and externalizing outcomes. Individuals with early RPs are vulnerable to insensitive parenting.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s00787-020-01632-2
Uncontrolled keywords: Regulatory problems; Parenting; Life-course; Confirmatory-comparative modelling; Attention regulation; CBCL; YASR
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
Depositing User: Ayten Bilgin
Date Deposited: 04 Oct 2020 16:30 UTC
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2020 11:05 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/82893 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Bilgin, Ayten: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9502-5814
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