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Asking the Right Questions: Increasing Fairness and Accuracy of Personality Assessments with Computerised Adaptive Testing

Lin, Yin (2020) Asking the Right Questions: Increasing Fairness and Accuracy of Personality Assessments with Computerised Adaptive Testing. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent,. (KAR id:82765)

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PDF (Erratum for Tables 25 and 26, pages 108 - 113, and Tables 57 and 58, page 190)
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Abstract

Personality assessments are frequently used in real-life applications to predict important outcomes. For such assessments, the forced choice (FC) response format has been shown to reduce response biases and distortions, and computerised adaptive testing (CAT) has been shown to improve measurement efficiency. This research developed FC CAT methodologies under the framework of the Thurstonian item response theory (TIRT) model. It is structured into a logical sequence of three areas of investigation, where the findings from each area inform key decisions in the next one. First, the feasibility of FC CAT is tested empirically. Analysis of large historical samples provides support for item parameter invariance when an item appears in different FC blocks, with person score estimation remaining very stable despite minor violations. Remedies for minimising the risk of assumption violations are also developed. Second, the design of the FC CAT algorithm is optimised. Current CAT methodologies are reviewed and adapted for TIRT-based FC assessments, and intensive simulation studies condense the design options to a small number of practical recommendations. Third, the practicality and usefulness of FC CAT is examined. An adaptive FC assessment measuring the HEXACO model of personality is developed and trialled empirically. In conclusion, this research mapped out a blueprint for developing FC CAT that use the TIRT model, highlighting the benefits, limitations, and key directions for further research.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
Thesis advisor: Brown, Anna
Uncontrolled keywords: Forced choice, computerised adaptive testing, multidimensional item response theory, Thurstonian IRT model.
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Funders: Organisations -1 not found.
SWORD Depositor: System Moodle
Depositing User: System Moodle
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2020 14:10 UTC
Last Modified: 13 May 2022 09:52 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/82765 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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