Skip to main content

Artificial Stupidity

Falk, Michael (2021) Artificial Stupidity. Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, 46 (1-2). pp. 36-52. ISSN 0308-0188. (doi:10.1080/03080188.2020.1840219) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:82585)

PDF Author's Accepted Manuscript
Language: English

Restricted to Repository staff only until 6 March 2022.

Contact us about this Publication
[thumbnail of AI_discontents - Artificial Stupidity FINAL.pdf]
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1080/03080188.2020.1840219

Abstract

Public debate about AI is dominated by Frankenstein Syndrome, the fear that AI will become superhuman and escape human control. Although superintelligence is certainly a possibility, the interest it excites can distract the public from a more imminent concern: the rise of Artificial Stupidity (AS). This article discusses the roots of Frankenstein Syndrome in Mary Shelley’s famous novel of 1818. It then provides a philosophical framework for analysing the stupidity of artificial agents, demonstrating that modern intelligent systems can be seen to suffer from ‘stupidity of judgement’. Finally it identifies an alternative literary tradition that exposes the perils and benefits of AS. In the writings of Edmund Spenser, Jonathan Swift and E.T.A. Hoffmann, ASs replace, enslave or delude their human users. More optimistically, Joseph Furphy and Laurence Sterne imagine ASs that can serve human intellect as maps or as pipes. These writers provide a strong counternarrative to the myths that currently drive the AI debate. They identify ways in which even stupid artificial agents can evade human control, for instance by appealing to stereotypes or distancing us from reality. And they underscore the continuing importance of the literary imagination in an increasingly automated society.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/03080188.2020.1840219
Uncontrolled keywords: artificial intelligence, stupidity, English literature, German literature, Australian literature, superintelligence, singularity, cognitive artefacts
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PR English literature
P Language and Literature > PT German literature
Q Science > QA Mathematics (inc Computing science) > QA 76 Software, computer programming, > QA76.87 Neural computers, neural networks
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Arts and Humanities > School of English > Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century
Depositing User: Michael Falk
Date Deposited: 17 Sep 2020 15:54 UTC
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2021 12:27 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/82585 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Falk, Michael: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9261-8390
  • Depositors only (login required):