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Popular Music in Canterbury Between 1965 and 1971 and Theories of Scene

Stumpenhuson-Payne, Alan (2018) Popular Music in Canterbury Between 1965 and 1971 and Theories of Scene. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis, University of Kent,. (KAR id:82019)

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Abstract

This thesis examines the phenomenon and lasting influence of what has come to be known as the Canterbury Scene. It argues that the Canterbury music scene is best understood through an investigation of the scale and diversity of live music in the city in the 1960s, the nostalgia and interest it still evokes and the sense of popular music heritage which it contains. It adds to the relatively small body of literature about the Scene by examining academic and theoretical writing on the subject and using this and other paradigm examples to cast further light on the relationship between the music and its perceived location.

My original contribution to knowledge is a detailed account of the state of musical performance and the performative features in Canterbury between 1965 and 1971, in particular. Through this, an assessment of the importance of the music to the canon of progressive rock may be made and new insight gained into the extent to which the Canterbury of fifty years ago might be said to have been the locus of a scene or, at least, have given some support to a network of musicians - albeit musicians in bands with little economic co-dependency.

The work draws on first hand accounts of the music making of the time as well as local media accounts, fan magazines and online materials and attention is paid both to the translocal nature of the scene and musicians for whom Canterbury and East Kent remained the geographical focus of the musical practices.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctor of Philosophy (PhD))
Thesis advisor: Curry, Ben
Uncontrolled keywords: Ethnomusicology, Progressive rock, Canterbury Music Scene, Counterculture, Canterbury Sound, Mythscape, Online Fans
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Arts and Humanities > School of Arts
SWORD Depositor: System Moodle
Depositing User: System Moodle
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2020 14:10 UTC
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2021 10:22 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/82019 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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