Skip to main content

Study of interactions between novel Supramolecular Self-associating Antimicrobials (SSAs) and phospholipid bilayer Nanodiscs.

Townshend, Georgina (2019) Study of interactions between novel Supramolecular Self-associating Antimicrobials (SSAs) and phospholipid bilayer Nanodiscs. Master of Science by Research (MScRes) thesis, University of Kent,. (KAR id:80875)

PDF
Language: English
Download (3MB) Preview
[thumbnail of 191gt264_MSc_2020_thesis.pdf]
Preview
This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.
Request an accessible format

Abstract

Novel research in antimicrobials is desperately needed due to high levels of antimicrobial resistance. It has been predicted that by 2050 antimicrobial resistant bacteria will be the cause of more deaths globally per year than cancer.2 Herein, is the study of novel supramolecular self-associating amphiphilic compounds and their selectivity towards bacterial membranes. Here model membranes are formed mimicking bacterial cells and mammalian cells for comparison. The model membranes are termed nanodiscs and consist of lipid bilayers solubilised with a co-polymer. Nanodiscs provide an excellent mimetic system for the investigation in binding association studies through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This investigation determines how different constituents attached to the same molecules affect their hydrogen bond donating (HBD) and hydrogen bond accepting (HBA) functionalities, through NMR analysis. The HBD/HBA causes membrane disruption and therefore shows potential for their use as future antimicrobial agents.

Item Type: Thesis (Master of Science by Research (MScRes))
Thesis advisor: Ortega-Roldan, Jose
Thesis advisor: Hiscock, Jennifer
Uncontrolled keywords: nanodiscs SMALPS self-associating amphiphilic NMR DLS
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Biosciences
SWORD Depositor: System Moodle
Depositing User: System Moodle
Date Deposited: 15 Apr 2020 16:10 UTC
Last Modified: 25 Feb 2021 11:58 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/80875 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):