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Enamel growth rates of anterior teeth in males and females from modern and ancient British populations

Aris, Christopher, Mahoney, Patrick, Deter, Chris (2020) Enamel growth rates of anterior teeth in males and females from modern and ancient British populations. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, . ISSN 0002-9483. E-ISSN 1096-8644. (doi:10.1002/ajpa.24068) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:80822)

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Abstract

Objectives: This study explored biological sex differences in the regional daily growth rates of human anterior enamel from modern and ancient populations in Britain.

Methods: Maxillary permanent incisors (n=80) and canines (n=69) from Roman, Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, and Modern day populations were analysed using histological methods. Daily secretion rates (DSRs) were collected for inner, mid, and outer regions of cuspal and lateral enamel. Modern day samples were of known sex, archaeological individuals had sex determined using standard osteological methods. Variation in DSRs between the sexes, both between and within populations, was sought using parametric and non-parametric tests.

Results: When all samples were pooled, there was no significant difference between males and females. Similarly no significant differences in DSRs were identified between male and females within each population. When DSRs were compared between the populations, DSRs decreased from the more ancient to the more recent populations for males, and for females. More inter-population differences were observed in males.

Discussion: This study presents evidence for the relative consistency of enamel DSRs between male and female groups within each British population. Inter-population analyses found DSRs slowed significantly between Roman and modern day populations for both sexes, with male DSRs showing the greatest variation between populations.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/ajpa.24068
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biological Anthropology
Depositing User: Patrick Mahoney
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2020 08:17 UTC
Last Modified: 19 May 2020 16:26 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/80822 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Aris, Christopher: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4735-8275
Mahoney, Patrick: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2715-3096
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