Skip to main content

Effect of metabolosome encapsulation peptides on enzyme activity, co-aggregation, incorporation and bacterial microcompartment formation

Juodeikis, Rokas, Lee, Matthew J., Mayer, Matthias, Mantell, Judith, Brown, Ian R., Verkade, Paul, Woolfson, Derek N., Prentice, Michael B., Frank, Stefanie, Warren, Martin J. and others. (2020) Effect of metabolosome encapsulation peptides on enzyme activity, co-aggregation, incorporation and bacterial microcompartment formation. MicrobiologyOpen, . E-ISSN 2045-8827. (doi:10.1002/mbo3.1010) (KAR id:79929)

PDF Publisher pdf
Language: English


Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Download (4MB) Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF Author's Accepted Manuscript
Language: English

Restricted to Repository staff only
Contact us about this Publication
[img]
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1002/mbo3.1010

Abstract

Metabolosomes, catabolic bacterial microcompartments, are proteinaceous organelles that are associated with the breakdown of metabolites such as propanediol and ethanolamine. They are composed of an outer multi-component protein shell that encases a specific metabolic pathway. Protein cargo found within BMCs is directed by the presence of an encapsulation peptide that appears to trigger aggregation prior to the formation of the outer shell. We investigated the effect of three distinct encapsulation peptides on foreign cargo in a recombinant BMC system. Our data demonstrate that these peptides cause variation with respect to enzyme activity and protein aggregation. We observed that the level of protein aggregation generally correlates with the size of metabolosomes, while in the absence of cargo BMCs self-assemble into smaller compartments. The results agree with a flexible model for BMC formation based around the ability of the BMC shell to associate with an aggregate formed due to the interaction of encapsulation peptides.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/mbo3.1010
Uncontrolled keywords: Bacterial organelles, protein aggregation, synthetic biology, cargo, targeting
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: Martin Warren
Date Deposited: 03 Feb 2020 13:22 UTC
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2020 12:09 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/79929 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Warren, Martin J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6028-6456
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year