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Transcranial direct current stimulation effects on neural processing in post-stroke aphasia

Darkow, Robert, Martin, Andrew, Würtz, Anna, Flöel, Agnes, Meinzer, Marcus (2017) Transcranial direct current stimulation effects on neural processing in post-stroke aphasia. Human Brain Mapping, 38 (3). pp. 1518-1531. ISSN 1065-9471. (doi:10.1002/hbm.23469) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:79703)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23469

Abstract

Non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can enhance recovery after stroke. However, fundamental knowledge about how tDCS impacts neural processing in the lesioned human brain is currently lacking. In the present study, it was investigated how tDCS modulates brain function in patients with post-stroke language impairment (aphasia). In a cross-over, randomized trial, patients named pictures of common objects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Concurrently, excitatory (anodal-) or sham-tDCS (1 mA, 20 min, or 30 s, respectively) was administered to the left primary motor cortex, a montage with demonstrated potential to improve aphasic language. By choosing stimuli that could reliable be named by the patients, the authors aimed to derive a pure measure of stimulation effects that was independent of treatment or performance effects and to assess how tDCS interacts with the patients' residual language network. Univariate fMRI data analysis revealed reduced activity in domain-general regions mediating high-level cognitive control during anodal-tDCS. Independent component functional network analysis demonstrated selectively increased language network activity and an inter-correlated shift from higher to lower frequency bands, indicative of increased within-network communication. Compared with healthy controls, anodal-tDCS resulted in overall “normalization” of brain function in the patients. These results demonstrate for the first time how tDCS modulates neural processing in stroke patients. Such information is crucial to assure that behavioral treatments targeting specific neural circuits overlap with regions that are modulated by tDCS, thereby maximizing stimulation effects during therapy.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/hbm.23469
Uncontrolled keywords: adult; aged; aphasia; Article; brain depth stimulation; brain function; burn; clinical article; controlled study; crossover procedure; electroencephalogram; executive function; female; functional connectivity; functional magnetic resonance imaging; functional neuroimaging; human; language; male; middle aged; primary motor cortex; priority journal; pruritus; randomized controlled trial; stroke patient; transcranial direct current stimulation; aphasia; blood; case control study; cerebrovascular accident; complication; diagnostic imaging; image processing; motor cortex; nomenclature; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; photostimulation; physiology; principal component analysis; procedures; reaction time; stroke rehabilitation; transcranial direct current stimulation, oxygen, Adult; Aged; Aphasia; Case-Control Studies; Cross-Over Studies; Female; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Motor Cortex; Names; Oxygen; Photic Stimulation; Principal Component Analysis; Reaction Time; Stroke; Stroke Rehabilitation; Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Andrew Martin
Date Deposited: 04 Feb 2020 11:11 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 14:10 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/79703 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Martin, Andrew: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9445-9151
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