Skip to main content

The early postnatal period, mini-puberty, provides a window on the role of testosterone in human neurobehavioural development

Hines, Melissa, Spencer, Debra, Kung, Karson T.F., Browne, Wendy V., Constantinescu, Mihaela, Noorderhaven, Rebecca M. (2016) The early postnatal period, mini-puberty, provides a window on the role of testosterone in human neurobehavioural development. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 38 . pp. 69-73. ISSN 0959-4388. (doi:10.1016/j.conb.2016.02.008) (KAR id:79636)

PDF Author's Accepted Manuscript
Language: English


Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Download (591kB) Preview
[img]
Preview
Official URL
https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2016.02.008

Abstract

Experimental research in non-human mammals indicates that testosterone exposure during early periods of rapid brain development has enduring influences on brain and behaviour. These influences are exerted when testosterone is higher in developing males than females, and the affected characteristics are those that differ by sex. Testosterone is higher in males than in females from about weeks 8 to 24 of human gestation and then again during early infancy, and both of these periods are times of rapid brain development. Substantial evidence suggests that testosterone prenatally influences human neurobehavioral development. Emerging evidence suggests that the early postnatal period is important too. This early postnatal period could provide a window for studying testosterone interacting with experience to shape human gender development.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.conb.2016.02.008
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
Depositing User: Karson Kung
Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2020 02:42 UTC
Last Modified: 07 Feb 2020 04:12 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/79636 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Kung, Karson T.F.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1598-1513
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year